Archive for July, 2016

How to Be a Good Research Supplier

Crux Logo Final 2016

A while back, we posted “How to Be a Good Research Client” to help clients understand the makings of a successful partnership from the supplier perspective. Here, we’d like to do the opposite: advise suppliers on how to position for success with their clients.

Being an outstanding supplier goes beyond the technical abilities of understanding statistics, experimental design, business, and marketing. There are many researchers who have these skills, but are not great suppliers. They are necessary, but not sufficient skills.

It starts with empathy – a good supplier will understand not just the business situation the client is facing, but also the internal pressures he/she faces. We’ve found over time that suppliers who have spent time as clients themselves understand what happens to projects after the final presentation in a way that many suppliers just cannot.

So, here goes:  Our 10 tips on how to be a good research supplier.

  1. Begin by seeking out the right clients. There is simply too much pressure, especially at larger research firms, to take on every project that comes your way. It really helps if you have guidelines as to which clients you will accept: which ones match with your skills in a unique way, are doing things you are genuinely interested in studying, and have individuals who are good project managers.
  2. Be honest about what you are good at and not so good at. Research isn’t quite like law or medicine where every task seems to devolve to a specialty, but there are specialties. You are not good at everything and neither is your firm. Once you realize this, you can concentrate on where you provide unique value.
  3. Understand what is at stake. Some market research projects influence how millions of dollars are spent. Still others are a part of a substantial initiative within a company. Somewhere, there is somebody whose career hinges on the success of this initiative. While the research project might come and go in a matter of months to you as a supplier and be one of a dozen you are working on, the success of the project might make or break someone’s career. It is good to never lose sight of that.
  4. Price projects to be profitable. You should price projects to make a strong profit for your firm and then not waiver easily on price. Why? Because then you can put all thoughts of profitability out of your mind at the onset and focus on delivering a great project. Never, and we mean never, take on an unprofitable project because of the prospects of further projects coming down the road. It doesn’t serve you or your client well.
  5. Don’t nickel and dime clients. They will ask for things you didn’t bid on or anticipate. Not everything they need will be foreseeable. An extra banner table. A second presentation. A few extra interviews. Follow ups you didn’t expect. Just do it and don’t look back. Larger research firms are prone to charging for every little thing the client asks. After a while, the client stops asking and moves onto another firm. Projects can be expensive. Nickle and diming your clients for small requests is about as frustrating as buying a new car and having the dealer charge you extra to put floor mats in it.
  6. Never be the one your client is waiting on. If there is one rule here that we feel we have mastered at Crux it is this one. There are a lot of moving parts in a project. You often need things from clients and they need things from you along the way. Never be the one people are waiting on. Stay late if you have to, come in early, work from home … do anything but be the “rate limiting factor” on a project. Your clients will love you for it.
  7. Be around “forever” for follow ups. We have seen suppliers put in contracts that they are available for 3 months from when the project is over for follow up discussions. Why? We love it when clients call years after a project is over as it means the project is still having an influence on their business. Be there as long as it takes for them.
  8. Be human. It took us a little time to learn this one. We used to be very workmanlike and professional around clients to the point of being a bit “stiff.” Then we realized clients want to work with people who are professional about the task at hand, but also fun to be around, and well, human. Granted, they don’t want to hear about every stress of your personal life, but relax a little and be who you are. If that doesn’t work out well for you, you might not be in the right career.
  9. Make them feel like they are your only client. You might have a dozen projects on your plate, family commitments tugging at you, coworkers driving you crazy, and a myriad of other things competing for your time. Time management isn’t easy in a deadline driven field such as research. But it also isn’t your client’s problem. They should feel like you have nothing else to do all day but work on their project. The focus needs to be on them, and not your time management. When you are late for a meeting because you had another run over, you are telling your client they aren’t your number one priority.
  10. Follow up. The project might be over for you, but it lives on longer for your client.  Be sure to follow up a few weeks down the line to see if there is anything else you can do. You’ll be surprised at how often the next project comes up during this conversation.