Archive for the 'Election polling' Category

Among college students, Bernie Sanders is the overwhelming choice for the Democratic nomination

Crux Research poll of college students shows Sanders at 23%, Biden at 16%, and all other candidates under 10%

ROCHESTER, NY – October 10, 2019 – Polling results released today by Crux Research show that if it was up to college students, Bernie Sanders would win the Democratic nomination the US Presidency. Sanders is the favored candidate for the nomination among 23% of college students compared to 16% for Joe Biden. Elizabeth Warren is favored by 8% of college students followed by 7% support for Andrew Yang.

  • Bernie Sanders: 23%
  • Joe Biden: 16%
  • Elizabeth Warren: 8%
  • Andrew Yang: 7%
  • Kamala Harris: 6%
  • Beto O’Rourke: 5%
  • Pete Buttigieg: 4%
  • Tom Steyer: 3%
  • Cory Booker: 3%
  • Michael Bennet: 2%
  • Tulsi Gabbard: 2%
  • Amy Klobuchar: 2%
  • Julian Castro: 1%
  • None of these: 5%
  • Unsure: 10%
  • I won’t vote: 4%

The poll also presented five head-to-head match-ups. Each match-up suggests that the Democratic candidate currently has a strong edge over President Trump, with Sanders having the largest edge.

  • Sanders versus Trump: 61% Sanders; 17% Trump; 12% Someone Else; 7% Not Sure; 3% would not vote
  • Warren versus Trump: 53% Warren; 18% Trump; 15% Someone Else; 9% Not Sure; 5% would not vote
  • Biden versus Trump: 51% Biden; 18% Trump; 19% Someone Else; 8% Not Sure; 4% would not vote
  • Harris versus Trump: 48% Harris; 18% Trump; 20% Someone Else; 10% Not Sure; 4% would not vote
  • Buttigieg versus Trump: 44% Buttigieg; 18% Trump; 22% Someone Else; 11% Not Sure; 5% would not vote

The 2020 election could very well be determined on the voter turnout among young people, which has traditionally been much lower than among older age groups.

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Methodology
This poll was conducted online between October 1 and October 8, 2019. The sample size was 555 US college students (aged 18 to 29). Quota sampling and weighting were employed to ensure that respondent proportions for age group, sex, race/ethnicity, and region matched their actual proportions in the US college student population.

This poll did not have a sponsor and was conducted and funded by Crux Research, an independent market research firm that is not in any way associated with political parties, candidates, or the media.

All surveys and polls are subject to many sources of error. The term “margin of error” is misleading for online polls, which are not based on a probability sample which is a requirement for margin of error calculations. If this study did use probability sampling, the margin of error would be +/-4%.

About Crux Research Inc.
Crux Research partners with clients to develop winning products and services, build powerful brands, create engaging marketing strategies, enhance customer satisfaction and loyalty, improve products and services, and get the most out of their advertising.

Using quantitative and qualitative methods, Crux connects organizations with their customers in a wide range of industries, including health care, education, consumer goods, financial services, media and advertising, automotive, technology, retail, business-to-business, and non-profits.
Crux connects decision makers with customers, uses data to inspire new thinking, and assures clients they are being served by experienced, senior level researchers who set the standard for customer service from a survey research and polling consultant.

To learn more about Crux Research, visit http://www.cruxresearch.com.

How to be an intelligent consumer of political polls

As the days get shorter and the air gets cooler, we are on the edge of a cool, colorful season. We are not talking about autumn — instead, “polling season” is upon us! As the US Presidential race heats up, one thing we can count on is being inundated with polls and pundits spinning polling results.

Most market researchers are interested in polls. Political polling pre-dates the modern market research industry and most market research techniques used today have antecedents from the polling world. And, as we have stated in a previous post, polls can be as important as the election itself.

The polls themselves influence voting behavior which should place polling organizations in an ethical quandary. Our view is that polls, when properly done, are an important facet of modern democracy. Polls can inform our leaders as to what the electorate cares about and keep them accountable. This season, polls are determining which candidates get on the debate stage and are driving which issues candidates are discussing most prominently.

The sheer number of polls that we are about to see will be overwhelming. Some will be well-conducted, some will be shams, and many will be in between. To help, we thought we’d write this post on how be an intelligent consumer of polls and what to look out for when reading the polls or hearing about them in the media.

  • First, and this is harder than it sounds, you have to put your own biases aside. Maybe you are a staunch conservative or liberal or maybe you are in the middle. Whatever your leaning, your political views are likely going to get in the way of you becoming a good reader of the polls. It is hard to not have a confirmation bias when viewing polls, where you tend to accept a polling result that confirms what you believe or hope will happen and question a result that doesn’t fit with your map of the world. I have found the best way to do this is to first try to view the poll from the other side. Say you are a conservative. Start by thinking about how you would view the poll if you leaned left instead.
  • Next, always, and I mean ALWAYS, discover who paid for the poll. If it is an entity that has a vested interest in the results, such as a campaign, a PAC, and industry group or lobbyist, go no further. Don’t even look at the poll. In fact, if the sponsor of the poll isn’t clearly identified, move on and spend your time elsewhere. Good polls always disclose who paid for it.
  • Don’t just look to who released the poll, review which organization executed it. For the most part, polls executed by major polling organizations (Gallup, Harris, ORC, Pew, etc.) will be worth reviewing as will polls done by colleges with polling centers (Marist, Quinnipiac, Sienna, etc.). But there are some excellent polling firms out there you likely have never heard of. When in doubt, remember that Five Thirty Eight gives pollsters grades based on their past performances.  Despite what you may hear, polls done by major media organizations are sound. They have polling editors that understand all the nuances and have standards for how the polls are conducted. These organizations tend to partner with major polling organizations that likewise have the methodological muscle that is necessary.
  • Never, and I mean NEVER, trust a poll that comes from a campaign itself. At their best, campaigns will cherry pick results from well executed polls to make their candidate look better. At their worst, they will implement a biased poll intentionally. Why? Because much of the media, even established mainstream media, will cover these polls. (As an aside, if you are a researcher don’t trust the campaigns either. From my experience, you have about a 1 in 3 chance of being paid by a campaign for conducting their poll.)
  • Ignore any talk about the margin of error. The margin of error on a poll has become a meaningless statistic that is almost always misinterpreted by the media. A margin of error really only makes sense when a random or probability sample is being used. Without going into detail, there isn’t a single polling methodology in use today that can credibly claim to be using a probability sample. Regardless, being within the margin of error does not mean a race is too close to call anyway. It really just means it is too close to call with 95% certainty.
  • When reading stories on polls in the media, read beyond the headline. Remember, headlines are not written by reporters or pollsters. They are written by editors that in many ways have had their journalistic integrity questioned and have become “click hunters.” Their job is to get you to click on the story and not necessarily to accurately summarize the poll. Headlines are bound to be more sensational that the polling results merit.

All is not lost though. There are plenty of good polls out there worth looking at. Here is the routine I use when I have a few minutes and want to discover what the polls are saying.

  • First, I start at the Polling Report. This is an independent site that compiles credible polls. It has a long history. I remember reading it in the 90’s when it was a monthly mailed newsletter. I start here because it is nothing more than raw poll results with no spin whatsoever. Their Twitter feed shows the most recently submitted polls.
  • I sometimes will also look at Real Clear Politics. They also curate polls, but they also provide analysis. I tend to just stay on their poll page and ignore the analysis.
  • FiveThirtyEight doesn’t provide polling results in great detail, but usually draws longitudinal graphs on the probability of each candidate winning the nomination and the election. Their predictions have valid science behind them and the site is non-partisan. This is usually the first site I look at to discover how others are viewing the polls.
  • For fun, I take a peek at BetFair which is an UK online betting site that allows wagers on elections. It takes a little training to understand what the current prices mean, but in essence this site tells you which candidates people are putting their actual money on. Prediction markets fascinate me; using this site to predict who might win is fun and geeky.
  • I will often check out Pew’s politics site. Pew tends to poll more on issues than “horse race” matchups on who is winning. Pew is perhaps the most highly respected source within the research field.
  • Finally, I go to the media. I tend to start with major media sites that seem to be somewhat neutral (the BBC, NPR, USA TODAY). After reviewing these sites, I then look at Fox News and MSNBC’s website because it is interesting to see how their biases cause them to say very different things about the same polls. I stay away from the cable channels (CNN, Fox, MSNBC) just because I can’t stand hearing boomers argue back and forth for hours on end.

This is, admittedly, way harder than it used to be. We used to just be able to let Peter Jennings or Walter Cronkite tell us what the polls said. Now, there is so much out there that to truly get an objective handle on what is going on takes serious work. I truly think that if you can become an intelligent, unbiased consumer of polls it will make you a better market researcher. Reading polls objectively takes a skill that applies well to data analysis and insight generation, which is what market research is all about.

How Did Pollsters Do in the Midterm Elections?

Our most read blog post was posted the morning after the 2016 Presidential election. It is a post we are proud of because it was composed in the haze of a shocking election result. While many were celebrating their side’s victory or in shock over their side’s losses, we mused about what the election result meant for the market research industry.

We predicted pollsters would become defensive and try to convince everyone that the polls really weren’t all that bad. In fact, the 2016 polls really weren’t. Predictions of the popular vote tended to be within a percent and a half or so of the actual result which was better than for the previous Presidential election in 2012. However, the concern we had about the 2016 polls wasn’t related to how close they were to the result. The issue we had was one of bias: 22 of the 25 final polls we found made an inaccurate prediction and almost every poll was off in the same direction. That is the very definition of bias in market research.

Suppose that you had 25 people flip a coin 100 times. On average, you’d expect 50% of the flips to be “heads.” But, if say, 48% of them were “heads” you shouldn’t be all that worried as that can happen. But, if 22 of the 25 people all had less than 50% heads you should worry that there was something wrong with the coins or they way they were flipped. That is, in essence, what happened in the 2016 election with the polls.

Anyway, this post is being composed the aftermath of the 2018 midterm elections. How did the pollsters do this time?

Let’s start with FiveThirtyEight.com. We like this site because they place probabilities around their predictions. Of course, this gives them plausible deniability when their prediction is incorrect, as probabilities are never 0% or 100%. (In 2016 they gave Donald Trump a 17% chance of winning and then defended their prediction.) But this organization looks at statistics in the right way.

Below is their final forecast and the actual result. Some results are still pending, but at this moment, this is how it shapes up.

  • Prediction: Republicans having 52 seats in the Senate. Result: It looks like Republicans will have 53 seats.
  • Prediction: Democrats holding 234 and Republicans holding 231 House seats. Result: It looks like Democrats will have 235 or 236 seats.
  • Prediction: Republicans holding 26 and Democrats holding 24 Governorships. Result: Republicans now hold 26 and Democrats hold 24 Governorships.

It looks like FiveThirtyEight.com nailed this one. We also reviewed a prediction market and state-level polls, and it seems that this time around the polls did a much better job in terms of making accurate predictions. (We must say that on election night, FiveThirtyEight’s predictions were all over the place when they were reporting in real time. But, as results settled, their pre-election forecast looked very good.)

So, why did polls seem to do so much better in 2018 than 2016? One reason is the errors cancel out when you look at large numbers of races. Sure, the polls predicted Democrats would have 234 seats, and that is roughly what they achieved. But, in how many of the 435 races did the polls make the right prediction? That is the relevant question, as it could be the case that the polls made a lot of bad predictions that compensated for each other in the total.

That is a challenging analysis to do because some races had a lot of polling, others did not, and some polls are more credible than others. A cursory look at the polls suggests that 2018 was a comeback victory for the pollsters. We did sense a bit of an over-prediction favoring the Republican Senatorial candidates, but on the House side there does not seem to be a clear bias.

So, what did the pollsters do differently? Not much really. Online sampling continues to evolve and get better, and the 2016 result has caused polling firms to concentrate more carefully on their sampling. One of the issues that may have caused the 2016 problem is that pollsters are starting to almost exclusively use the top 2 or 3 panel companies. Since 2016, there has been a consolidation among sample suppliers, and as a result, we are seeing less variance in polls as pollsters are largely all using the same sample sources. The same few companies provide virtually all the sample used by pollsters.

Another key difference was that turnout in the midterms was historically high. Polls are more accurate in high turnout races, as polls almost always survey many people who do not end up showing up on election day, particularly young people. However, there are large and growing demographic differences (age, gender, race/ethnicity) in supporters of each party, and that greatly complicates polling accuracy. Some demographic subgroups are far more likely than others to take part in a poll.

Pollsters are starting to get online polling right. A lot of the legacy firms in this space are still entrenched in the telephone polling world, have been protective of their aging methodologies, and have been slow to change. After nearly 20 years of online polling the upstarts have finally forced the bigger polling firms to question their approaches and to move to a world where telephone polling just doesn’t make a lot of sense. Also, many of the old guard, telephone polling experts are now retired or have passed on, and they have largely led the resistance to online polling.

Gerrymandering helps the pollster as well. It still remains the case that relatively few districts are competitive. Pew suggests that only 1 in 7 districts was competitive. You don’t have to be a pollster to accurately predict how about 85% of the races will turn out. Only about 65 of the 435 house races were truly at stake. If you just flipped a coin in those races, in total your prediction of house seats would have been fairly close.

Of course, pollsters may have just gotten lucky. We view that as unlikely though, as there were too many races. Unlike in 2018 though, in 2016 we haven’t seen any evidence of bias (in a statistical sense) in the direction of polling errors.

So, this is a good comeback success for the polling industry and should give us greater confidence for 2020. It is important that the research industry broadcasts this success. When pollsters have a bad day, like they did in 2016, it affects market research as well. Our clients lose confidence in our ability to provide accurate information. When the pollsters get it right, it helps the research industry as well.

NEW POLL SHOWS THAT IF US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION WERE HELD AGAIN, INCREASED TURNOUT WOULD LIKELY RESULT IN A CLINTON VICTORY

Crux Research poll shows 92% of Trump voters and 91% of Clinton voters would not change their vote

ROCHESTER, NY – MARCH 12, 2017 – Polling results released today by Crux Research show that if there were a “do over” and the election were held again tomorrow, Hillary Clinton would likely win the Presidency.  But, this would not happen as a result of voters changing their vote – rather voters who didn’t turn out in the fall would provide an edge to Clinton.

In 2016, the popular vote was 48.0% for Hillary Clinton and 45.9% for Donald Trump (a gap of 2.1)[1].  This new poll shows that if the election were held again among these two candidates, the popular vote would be estimated to be 52.9% Clinton and 47.1% Trump (a gap of 5.8).

Further, few Clinton or Trump supporters would change their voting behaviors:

  • 92% of those who voted for Trump in November would vote for him again tomorrow.
  • 91% of those who voted for Clinton in November would vote for her again tomorrow.

A new election would bring out additional voters.  57% of non-voters in 2016 would intend to vote. Their votes would split approximately 60% for Clinton and 40% for Trump.  So, increased turnout would likely provide a decisive edge to Clinton.

A closer look at swing states (the five states where the winner won by 2 percentage points or less[2]), shows that Clinton  would win these states by a gap of 9.3, likely enough to change the election result.

WHO WOULD WIN TOMORROW?
Suppose there was a “do over” and the US presidential election were held again tomorrow. 
Whom would you vote for?
Actual 2016 Election Result March 2017 Crux Research Poll*
Donald Trump 45.9% 47.1%
Hillary Clinton 48.0% 52.9%
Others 6.0%
*2017 Crux Research poll is among those who say they would vote if the election were held again tomorrow.
VOTE SWITCHING BEHAVIOR
Suppose there was a “do over” and the US presidential election were held again tomorrow. 
Whom would you vote for?
Voted for Trump in 2016 Voted for Clinton in 2016
Donald Trump 92% 1%
Hillary Clinton 1% 91%
Others 4% 7%
Wouldn’t vote 2% 1%
SWING STATES RESULTS
Suppose there was a “do over” and the US presidential election were held again tomorrow. 
Whom would you vote for?
Actual 2016 Election Result in Swing States Swing States March 2017 Crux Research Poll*
Donald Trump 48.0% 47.1%
Hillary Clinton 47.2% 52.9%
Others 4.8%
*2017 Crux Research poll is among those who say they would vote if the election were held again tomorrow.
** Swing states are five states where the election was decided by 2 percentage points or less (PA, MI, WI, FL, and NH).

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Methodology

This poll was conducted online between March 6 and March 10, 2017. The sample size was 1,010 US adults (aged 18 and over). Quota sampling and weighting were employed to ensure that respondent proportions for age group, sex, race/ethnicity, and region matched their actual proportions in the population.  The poll was also balanced to reflect the actual proportion of voters who voted for each candidate in the 2016 election.

This poll did not have a sponsor and was conducted and funded by Crux Research, an independent market research firm that is not in any way associated with political parties, candidates, or the media.

All surveys and polls are subject to many sources of error.  The term “margin of error” is misleading for online polls, which are not based on a probability sample which is a requirement for margin of error calculations.  If this study did use probability sampling, the margin of error would be +/-3%.

About Crux Research Inc.

Crux Research partners with clients to develop winning products and services, build powerful brands, create engaging marketing strategies, enhance customer satisfaction and loyalty, improve products and services, and get the most out of their advertising.

Using quantitative and qualitative methods, Crux connects organizations with their customers in a wide range of industries, including health care, education, consumer goods, financial services, media and advertising, automotive, technology, retail, business-to-business, and non-profits.

Crux connects decision makers with customers, uses data to inspire new thinking, and assures clients they are being served by experienced, senior level researchers who set the standard for customer service from a survey research and polling consultant.

To learn more about Crux Research, visit www.cruxresearch.com.

[1] http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/index.html

[2] PA, MI, WI, FL, and NH were decided by 2 percentage points or less.


Visit the Crux Research Website www.cruxresearch.com

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